Commission on Population     
 Regional Population Office No. 10

       J.V. Seriņa St., Carmen, Cagayan de Oro City

"Tatlumpu't limang taong paglilingkod tungo sa matatag na Pilipinong pamilya"
 
   

OZAMIZ CITY
   
   

 

Misamis was an old Spanish town which was conquered through faith by Jesuit missionaries. Although obscure, the origin of the name "Misamis" is believed to have derived from the Subano word "Kuyamis," a variety of coconut. The name persisted as a geographical reference and evolved into "Misamis," which became a chartered city on July 16, 1948. It was renamed "Ozamiz" in honor of the late Senator Jose Ozamiz, who pioneered underground resistance activities in Misamis Occidental against Japanese colonialists, was imprisoned at Fort Santiago, and finally executed at La Loam Cemetery together with other Filipino patriots.

Physical Characteristics

Location and Land Area

Ozamiz City is nestled at the entrance of Panguil Bay in Northern Mindanao with an estimated land area of 25,641 hectares. Behind it stands the 7,956 feet Malindang Mountain. It is bounded on the North by the Mindanao Sea; on the east by Iligan Bay which separates it from Cagayan de Oro; on the south by the province of Zamboanga del Sur.

Climate

Ozamiz City falls under VI or the intermediate type B of the Corona Climate classification.  Weather is fairly uniform or rainfall is more or less fairly distributed throughout the year although the months of February to April are quite drier.  The wettest months occur during November to December while dry months occur from February to March.  Temperatures is about equal, averaging to 27ēC.  The entire city is on the outside fringe of the typhoon belt and is seldom affected directly by tropical storms.

Topography and Land Features

Ozamiz City is characterized by its low flat elevation in urban areas rising in gentle slope upward to the west as it approaches the interior.  The terrain toward the western border is particularly rugged and very sparsely settled as hills and rolling lands are among its physical features.

The elevation of Ozamiz City ranes from the flat lowland of the poblacion and coastal barangays at about 1.9 meters above sea level to 562.55 meters above sea level of the nearest barangay approaching Mt. Malindang, Barangay Gala.  Other highly elevated barangays are Guimad, Trigos and Sangay Daku having an elevation  of 432.25 meters and 235.43 meters respectively.  It is not surprising that the climates in these particular barangays are noted to be cool and chilly, the inviting charms that made them a promising potential for tourist development.

Mt. Malindang, the landmark of the city and of the province of Misamis Occidental has the highest elevation of approximately 2,411 meters above sea level.  The mountain serves as a protecting wall against typhoons and strong winds.

Geology

So far, there is no detailed data on the presence of either metallic or non-metallic minerals in the city.  The aggregate materials found abundant in Ozamiz City are sand and gravel in pebble, cobble and boulder sizes.  Quarrying of the non-metallic minerals are located along Labo River.  These aggregates are used for road construction, foundation and building works.

Soil

There are eight (8) types of soil found in the city, the hydrosol, bantog, clay, guimbalaon clay loam, stony phase, adyuton clay, camiguin clay, jasaan clay and mountain soils (undifferentaitated).

 

Demographic Profile

Population Trends

Ozamiz City is the most populous unit within the geographic area of Misamis Occidental.  Its population was 110,420 in 2000 representing roughly 22.69% of the whole population of the province of Misamis Occidental.  This represents an increase of 8,476 during the intercensal years indicating an annual growth rate of 1.73.  There were about 22,170 households in the city having an average of 5 members per households.

Movement of people within the city maybe inferred from the population changes in the different barangays.  The trend of population in the remote barangays has been absorbed by other barangays adjacent to the poblacion.  Among the 51 barangays, Tinago, considered as one of the blighted areas registered the highest population.  This was followed by barangay Aguada.



Population by Sex and Age Group

The city has a young age structure.  Age group 0-14 comprised 36% of the total population.  The productive age group whose ages range from 15-64 constituted 60%.  The older age group which comprises age group 65 and over constituted roughly 4% of the total population. 

the effect of the city's young age structure is high dependency ratio.  The dependency ratio is roughly 66.24% which implies that for every 10 persons engaged in any economic activity, 7 are dependent for economic support.

The National Statistics Office survey on population showed on the average women slightly outnumbered the male by 1 indicating an almost even distribution between the female and male population of the city.

Female composition of the productive age group exceeded that of the male by 2.2%.  However, on the young age group the male outnumbered the female, while on the older age group female population slightly outnumbered the male.



Population Density

If its population is evenly distributed in proportion to its total land area of 164.07 square kilometers, there would be about 673 persons per square kilometers in 2000 as against 621.34 persons per square kilometer in 1995.

 

Births and Deaths

The year 2002 registered a decrease in the number of births from 4,434 in 2001 to 2,683 indicating 39.49 percentage of change.  From 2002 to 2003, a total number of births decreased by 1,071 or 39.91%.

On the other hand, death also posted a decreasing trend.  Recorded deaths in 2001 was 995, in 2002, a total of 887 deaths were registered and 2003 a decreased by 69 with total of 818 deaths.


Socio-Economic Indicators

 

Health, Nutrition and Family Planning

Ozamiz City has two government hospitals and seven privately owned hospitals, which are attending to the health of the people in the city and its neighboring places.  There are fifteen drugstores and forty-nine medical-dental clinics which catered to the people's need for medicines and services.

For the last four years the nutritional status of children had greatly improved.  There was a decreasing trend in the prevalence of moderately and severely malnourished pre-school and school children.

Health and nutrition are usually the basic needs of the younger age population (ages 0-14).  It is hoped that incidence of ailments be reduced during the four-year period.

Health services are extended such as immunization, pre/post-natal services, sputum microscopy, treatment of sputum positive cases, smear examination and treatment of STD cases and family  planning assistant.

Infant mortality rate went down from 30.94% in 2002 to 18.61% in 2003.  It showed a significant decrease due to the presence of health centers with personnel assigned there at rural and urban barangays.  The populace sought medical consultation and treatment.  They became more health conscious.  In the rural areas, some people still depend on folk medicines.

The health sector is manned by four (4) physicians, eleven (11) nurses, twenty (20) midwives, two (2) medical technologists, fourteen (14) sanitary inspectors, forty-five (45) trained hilots and five hundred ninety-nine (599) active Barangay health workers.

For the last two years the leading cause of morbidity for all ages was pneumonia, however in 2003, diarrhea became the number one leading cause of morbidity with a rate of 3,228.99 per 100,000 population and pneumonia became number two.  The needs of the populace are massive information/education campaign on preventive rather than curative medicine.

Safe water supply is about 96.5%.  However, due to some leakage of pipelines and poor drainage facilities, water and food-borned diseases existed.  Per census of the sanitary inspectors, 30.27% of the households have unsanitary toilets and no toilets at all.

Health Indicators, 2003

Births Number
1,612
Rate
13.73
Deaths Number
818
Deaths
6.97
Infant Deaths Number
30
Rate
18.61
Maternal Deaths Number
0
Rate
0.00
Nutritional Status

 

Severely Underweight
12
Moderately Underweight
249
Mildly Underweight
1,776
Normal
13,087
Overweight
444
Family Planning Program New Acceptors Condom
275
Injectables
337
IUD
92
LAM
1,134
Natural Family Planning
188
Pills
453
Male Sterilization
1
female Sterilization
22
TOTAL New Acceptors
2,502
Current Users Condom
949
Injectables
1,123
IUD
730
LAM
752
Natural Family Planning
284
Pills
2,883
Male Sterilization
26
female Sterilization
379
TOTAL Current Users
7,126
Contraceptive Prevalence Rate
43.35
Health Manpower Physician
4
Nurses
11
Midwives
20
Rural Sanitary Inspector
14
Dentist
1
Medical Technologist
2
Dental Aide
1
Active Barangay Health Workers
599
Trained Birth Attendants
45
Leading Causes of Morbidity Pnuemonia Number 
3,371
Rate
2,871.26
Diarrhea Number 
3,791
Rate
3,228.99
Wounds/Injuries Number 
2,054
Rate
1,749.50
Bronchitis Number 
2,013
Rate
1,714.58
Hypertension Number 
1,434
Rate
1,221.41
Influenza Number 
2,593
Rate
2,208.59
URTI Number 
1,425
Rate
1,213.75
Skin Diseases Number 
735
Rate
626.04
Parasitism Number 
486
Rate
413.95
Tonsillitis Number 
521
Rate
443.76
Household with Access to Safe Water Level I
8,674
Level II
3,543
Level III
8,575
Household With Sanitary Toilet
15,015

 


Education and Manpower Development

The SY 2003-2004 brought some major initiatives and efforts being pursued by the Department of Education.  It aimed at instituting improvements on access to quality basic education.  In the first quarter of 2003, it directed its efforts to review and assess various school programs and projects, their implementing procedures and activities and the extent to which set goals and targets had been met.

The DepEd was determined to pursue on-going educational programs as well as developed and implemented strategies designed to facilitate physical facilities, staff and curriculum developments which would redound to improved pupil/student performance.  It directed its efforts to improve the quality of basic education and expanded access to hinterland areas so that all children can attain a high level of learning achievement.  Likewise, it had taken measures to propel not only the educational workforce but also other sectors of society to commit to basic education in order to ensure that the fundamental learning needed for quality life would be a reality for every Filipino.  It aimed to develop Filipinos into functional literate, economically secure, socially and morally responsible and nationalistic citizens who would contribute to positive global development.  It focused its educational efforts on the promotion of a culture of excellence in its academic programs to produce a quality-educated citizenry who would be ready to participate in the modern atmosphere of the high technology life of the third millennium global competitiveness.

The non-formal education and vocational courses are effective and applicable.  Non-formal courses are designed to improve the abilities, values, aspirations, and skills of the people.  The trades learned by the clientele were applicable.  For the drop-outs and out-of-school youths, the courses most effective are Cosmetology, Dressmaking, Tailoring, Handicraft, Flower-making, Cooking, Baking, Practical Electricity, Automotive, Silk Screen Printing, and Hollow Blocks Making.  The contents of these courses were generally tasked-related and most practical.

Education Indicators, SY 2003-2004

Preschool Number of Schools Government
12
Private
10
Number of Teachers Government
8
Private
8
Elementary Number of  Schools Government
47
Private
10
Number of Teachers Government
553
Private
76
Number of Enrollees Government Male
9,564
Female
9,094
Private Male
809
Female
768
Survival Rate Male
70.96
Female
82.1
Participation Rate Government Male
84.01
Female
78.33
Private Male
7.62
Female

7.17

Teacher-Pupil Ratio

1:33

% of Children Who are Moderately and Severely Underweight

21.25

Secondary Number of Schools Government
6
Private
8
Number of Teachers Government
241
Private
82
Number of Enrollees Government Male
4,130
Female
4,352
Private Male
956
Female
1,150
Participation Rate Government Male
45.67
Female
53.30
Private Male
-
Female
-
Government Teacher-Student Ratio
1:37
Government Classroom-Student Ratio
1
Tertiary Number of Schools (2001-2002) Sectarian
1
Non-sectarian
4
Functional Literacy Rate (2002) Male
72.95
Female
63.81
Both
68.38
Simple Literacy Rate (2002) Male
83.58
Female
87.99
Both
85.78

 

Housing and Resettlement

Ozamiz City has a total population of 110,420 comprising 22,170 households with an average size of five members per household.

Like any other urban areas in the country, Ozamiz City is confronted with the problem of providing housing to its increasing population.  The most pressing problem that is faced by the city is the proliferation of slum dwellers and squatters.

As of 2000, the city has a total number of 21,663 occupied housing units: 19,343 single houses, 909 duplex, 940 multi-unit residential, 101 commercial/industrial/agricultural, 8 institutional living quarters, 5 other housing unit and 357 were not reported.  The ratio of households to occupied housing units is 1.02 while the ratio of household population to occupied housing units is 5.08.

 

Road Network

As of 1998, the city has 155 roads with a total length of 220.461 kilometers of all types of roads.  Barangay roads account for the highest with 172.992 kilometers or 79% followed by national roads and city streets with 26.956 kilometers and 20.513 kilometers representing 12% and 9% respectively.



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